THE ECONOMY’S EVIL WRATH

by scott tenorman

Many of my epiphanies have occurred as a result of someone or something recounting my subconscious thoughts. It happened on Wednesday night but it was an episode of South Park so I’ll chalk it up as an affirmation of my social beliefs.

Artist: BOAT
Song: Globes

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After spoofing Batman the week prior, Matt and Trey decided to tackle a more convoluted and socially sensitive issue: our perception of the US economy. Talking about the economic climate has become synonymous with bitching about gas prices and/or the weather (aka the real climate). In short, its crossed over into the realm of a pop cultural idea, which basically means that the shit is uncontrollable. And this is NOT TO BELITTLE THE CUTBACKS AND LAYOFFS that have occurred, but that’s actually part of the problem.


What this South Park episode speaks of, and what I agree with, is that hoarding money as a response to select incidents and mass media imposed ideals is poorly thought out and counterproductive. Spending money responsibly is the most effective way to rectify an ailing economic system. Lower income brackets are struggling most, so if we’ve officially given in to the idea of consumerism, we can’t bounce on them now and stop buying bullshit leisure items that stimulate and entertain, but most importantly provide jobs and support this cycle of buying and selling shit. I WOULD MUCH RATHER be living within a barter system of goods and services where rich old white men didn’t own my breakfast cereal, but this is the world we were born into and still live in, so get rational. Either give in to the idea that we need to keep buying things to keep our economic model flowing or stop bitching about it like it’s a magazine article. OR plan a secret getaway to Brazil (I have the visa application) and adventure away from these arbitrary technicalities. Metaphysics and meditation make a hell of a lot more sense than supporting consumerist societies that are mere centuries old.

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